Duties/Responsibilities of a Bailee ?

Duties/Responsibilities of a Bailee ?

Category : Contract – II

  1. Duty to take reasonable care
    In English law the duties of a gratuitous and non-gratuitous bailee are different. However, in Indian law, Section 151 treats all kinds of bailees the same with respect to the duty. It says that in all cases of bailment, the bailee is bound to take as much care of the goods bailed to him as a man of ordinary prudence would, under similar circumstances take, of his own goods of the same bulk, quality, and value as the goods bailed. The bailee must treat the goods as his own in terms of care. However, this does not mean that if the bailor is generally careless about his own goods, he can be careless about the bailed goods as well. He must take care of the goods as any person of ordinary prudence would of his things.

    In Blount vs War Office 1953, a house belonging to the plaintiff was requisitioned by the War Office. He was allowed to keep his certain articles in a room of the house, which he locked. The troops who occupied the house were not well controlled and broke into the room causing damage and theft of the articles. It was held that War office did not take care of the house as an owner would and held the War Office liable for the loss.

    Bailee, when not liable for loss etc. for thing bailed –
    As per section 152, in absence of a special contract, the bailee is not responsible for loss, destruction, or deterioration of the thing bailed, if he has taken the amount of care as described in section 151. This means that if the bailee has taken as much care of the goods as any owner of ordinary prudence would take of his goods, then the bailee will not be liable for the loss, destruction, or deterioration of the goods. No fixed rule regarding how much care is sufficient can be laid down and the nature, quality, and bulk of goods will be taken into consideration to find out if proper care was taken or not. In Gopal Singh vs Punjab National Bank, AIR 1976, Delhi HC held that on the account of partition of the country, when a bank had to flee along with mass exodus from Pakistan to India, the bank was not liable for the goods bailed to it in Pakistan.

    If the bailee has taken sufficient care in the security of the goods, then he will not be liable if they are stolen. However, negligence in security, for example leaving a bicycle unlocked on the street, would cause the bailee to be liable. In Join & Son vs Comeron 1922, the plaintiff stayed in a hotel and kept his belonging in his room, which were stolen. The hotel was held liable because they did not take care of its security as an owner would.

    If loss is caused due to the servant of the bailee, the bailee would be liable if the servant’s act is within the scope of his employment.

    Special Contract
    The extent of this responsibility can be changed by a contract between the bailor and the bailee. However, it is still debatable whether the responsibility can be reduce or it can be increased by a contract.  Section 152 opens with, “In absence of special contract”, which is interpreted by Punjab and Haryana HC, as the bailee can escape his responsibility by way of a contract with the bailor. However, in another case Gujarat HC held that the bank was liable for loss of bales of cotton kept in its custody irrespective of the clause that absolved the bank of all liability. This seems to be fair because no one can get a license to be negligent and a minimum standard of care is expected from everybody.

    2. Duty not to make unauthorized use (Section 154)
    Section 154
    says that if the bailee makes any use of the goods bailed which is not according to the conditions of the bailment, he is liable to make compensation to the bailor for any damage arising to the goods from or during such use of them.
    Illustration – A lends horse to B for his own riding only. B allows C, a member of his family, to ride the horse. C rides with care but the horse is injured. B is liable to compensate A for the injury to the horse.
    A hires a horse in Calcutta from B expressly to march to Benares. A rides with care but marches to Cuttack instead. The horse accidentally falls and is injured. A is liable to make compensation to B.

    Thus, we can see that bailee is supposed to use the goods only as per the purpose of the bailment. If the bailee makes any unauthorized use of the goods, he will be held absolutely liable for any damages.

    3. Duty not to mix (Section 155-157)
    The bailee should maintain the separate identity of the bailor’s goods. He should not mix his goods with bailor’s good without bailor’s consent. If he does so, and if the goods are separable, he is responsible for separating them and if they are not separable, he will be liable to compensate the bailor for his loss.  For example, A bails 100 bales of cotton with a particular mark to B. B, without A’s consent, mixes them with his own. A is entitled to have his 100 bales returned and B is bound to bear all expenses for separation. But if A bails a barrel of Cape flour worth Rs 45 to B and B mixes it with country flour worth Rs 25, B is liable to A for the loss of his flour.

    4. Duty to return (Section 160)
    Section 160 –
    It is the duty of the bailee to return or deliver according to the bailor’s directions, the goods bailed, without demand, as soon as the time for which they were bailed has expired or the purpose for which they were bailed has been accomplished.

    If the bailee keeps the goods after the expiry of the time for which they were bailed or after the purpose for which they were bailed has been accomplished, it will be at bailee’s risk and he will be responsible for any loss or damage to the goods arising howsoever.
    In Shaw & Co vs Symmons & Sons 1971, the plaintiff gave certain books to the defendant to be bound. The defendant bound them but did not return them within reasonable time. Subsequently, the books were burnt in an accidental file. The defendants were held liable for the loss of books.

    5. Duty to return increase (Section 163)
    As per Section 163, in absence of any contract to the contrary, the bailee is bound to deliver to the bailor, or according to his directions, any increase of profit which may have accrued from the goods bailed.
    Illustration – A leaves a cow in the custody of B to be taken care of. The cow has a calf. B is bound to deliver the calf as well as the cow to B.

    6. Duty not to set up jus tertii (Section 166)
    As per Section 166 if the bailor has no title and the bailee, in good faith returns the goods back to the bailor or as per the directions of the bailor, he is not responsible to the owner in respect of such delivery.  Thus, once the bailee takes the goods from the bailor, he agrees that the goods belong to the bailor and he must return them only to the bailor. He cannot deny redelivery to the bailor on the ground that the bailor is not the owner.

    If there is true owner of the goods, he can apply to the court to stop the delivery of the goods from the bailee to the bailor. This right is given to the true owner in section 167.

 


1 Comment

Aly Chiman

September 28, 2018 at 6:35 pm

Hello there,

My name is Aly and I would like to know if you would have any interest to have your website here at ccsuniversityllb.in promoted as a resource on our blog alychidesigns.com ?

We are in the midst of updating our broken link resources to include current and up to date resources for our readers. Our resource links are manually approved allowing us to mark a link as a do-follow link as well
.
If you may be interested please in being included as a resource on our blog, please let me know.

Thanks,
Aly

Leave a Reply